Saint Dominic

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John Paul II Visits

1.January 25 — February 1, 1979 – Dominican Republic, Mexico, and The Bahamas
2.June 2 — June 10, 1979 – Poland
3.September 29 — October 8, 1979 – Ireland and the United States (Boston, New York City, United Nations, Philadelphia, Des Moines, Chicago, and Washington, D.C.)
4.November 28 — November 30, 1979 – Turkey
5.May 2 — May 12, 1980 – Zaire, Congo, Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Côte d’Ivoire
6.May 30 — June 2, 1980 – France
7.June 30 — July 12, 1980 – Brazil
8.November 15 — November 19, 1980 – Germany[7]
9.February 16 — February 27, 1981 – Pakistan (stopover in Karachi), the Philippines, Guam, Japan, and the United States (stopover in Anchorage)
10.February 12 — February 19, 1982 – Nigeria, Benin, Gabon, and Equatorial Guinea
11.May 12 — May 15, 1982 – Portugal (pilgrimage to the Marian shrine in Fátima on the first anniversary of the assassination attempt against the pope)
12.May 28 — June 2, 1982 – United Kingdom
13.June 10 — June 13, 1982 – Brazil (stopover in Rio de Janeiro) and Argentina
14.June 15, 1982 – Switzerland
15.August 29, 1982 – San Marino
16.October 31 — November 9, 1982 – Spain
17.March 2 — March 10, 1983 – Portugal (stopover in Lisbon), Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Panama, El Salvador, Guatemala, Belize, and Haiti
18.June 16 June 23, 1983 – Poland
19.August 14 — August 15, 1983 – France (pilgrimage to the Marian shrine in Lourdes)
20.September 10 — September 13, 1983 – Austria
21.May 2 — May 12, 1984 – the United States (stopover in Fairbanks),[8] South Korea, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Thailand
22.June 12 — June 17, 1984 – Switzerland
23.September 9 — September 21, 1984 – Canada
24.October 10 — October 13, 1984 – Spain, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
25.January 26 — February 6, 1985 – Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Trinidad and Tobago
26.May 11 — May 21, 1985 – Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Belgium
27.August 8 — August 19, 1985 – Togo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Zaire, Kenya, and Morocco
28.September 8, 1985 – Switzerland and Liechtenstein
29.January 31 — February 11, 1986 – India
30.July 1 — July 8, 1986 – Colombia and Saint Lucia
31.October 4 — October 7, 1986 – France
32.November 18 — December 1, 1986 – Bangladesh, Singapore, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, and the Seychelles
33.March 31 — April 13, 1987 – Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina (celebration of World Youth Day in Buenos Aires)
34.April 30 — May 4, 1987 – Germany
35.June 8 — June 14, 1987 – Poland
36.September 10 — September 21, 1987 – United States (Miami, Columbia, New Orleans, San Antonio, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, Detroit), and Canada (Fort Simpson, NT)[9]
37.May 7 — May 18, 1988 – Uruguay, Bolivia, Peru, and Paraguay,
38.June 23 — June 27, 1988 – Austria
39.September 10 — September 19, 1988 – Zimbabwe, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Mozambique
40.October 8 — October 11, 1988 – France
41.April 28 — May 6, 1989 – Madagascar, Réunion, Zambia, and Malawi
42.June 1 — June 10, 1989 – Norway, Iceland, Finland, Denmark, and Sweden
43.August 19 — August 21, 1989 – Spain (celebration of World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela)
44.October 6 — October 16, 1989 – South Korea, Indonesia (including East Timor), and Mauritius
45.January 25 — February 1, 1990 – Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Chad
46.April 21 — April 22, 1990 – Czechoslovakia
47.May 6 — May 14, 1990 – Mexico and Curaçao
48.May 25 — May 27, 1990 – Malta
49.September 1 — September 10, 1990 – Malta (stopover in Luqa), Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, and Côte d’Ivoire (consecration of the Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro)
50.May 5 — May 13, 1991 – Portugal (pilgrimage to the Marian shrine in Fátima on the tenth anniversary of the assassination attempt against the pope)
51.June 1 — June 9, 1991 – Poland
52.August 13 — August 20, 1991 – Poland (celebration of World Youth Day in Częstochowa) and Hungary
53.October 12 — October 21, 1991 – Brazil
54.February 19 — February 26, 1992 – Senegal, Gambia, and Guinea
55.June 4 — June 10, 1992 – Angola and São Tomé and Príncipe
56.October 9 — October 14, 1992 – Dominican Republic
57.February 3 — February 10, 1993 – Benin, Uganda, and Sudan
58.April 25, 1993 – Albania
59.June 12 — June 17, 1993 – Spain
60.August 9 — August 16, 1993 – Jamaica, Mexico, and the United States (celebration of World Youth Day in Denver)
61.September 4 — September 10, 1993 – Lithuania (visit to the Hill of Crosses), Latvia, and Estonia
62.September 10 — September 11, 1994 – Croatia
63.January 11 — January 21, 1995 – Philippines (celebration of World Youth Day 1995 in Manila), Papua New Guinea, Australia, and Sri Lanka
64.May 20 — May 22, 1995 – Czech Republic and Poland
65.June 3 — June 4, 1995 – Belgium
66.June 30 — July 3, 1995 – Slovakia
67.September 14 — September 20, 1995 – Cameroon, South Africa, and Kenya
68.October 4 — October 9, 1995 – United States (Newark, East Rutherford, New York City, United Nations,[10] Yonkers, Baltimore)
69.February 5 — February 12, 1996 – Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Venezuela
70.April 14, 1996 – Tunisia
71.May 17 — May 19, 1996 – Slovenia
72.June 21 — June 23, 1996 – Germany
73.September 6 — September 7, 1996 – Hungary
74.September 19 — September 22, 1996 – France
75.April 12 — April 13, 1997 – Bosnia and Herzegovina
76.April 25 — April 27, 1997 – Czech Republic
77.May 10 — May 11, 1997 – Lebanon
78.May 31 — June 10, 1997 – Poland
79.August 21 — August 24, 1997 – France (celebration of World Youth Day in Paris)
80.October 2 — October 6, 1997 – Brazil
81.January 21 — January 26, 1998 – Cuba
82.March 21 — March 23, 1998 – Nigeria
83.June 19 — June 21, 1998 – Austria
84.October 2 — October 4, 1998 – Croatia
85.January 22 — January 28, 1999 – Mexico and United States (St. Louis)
86.May 7 — May 9, 1999 – Romania
87.June 5 — June 17, 1999 – Poland
88.September 19, 1999 – Slovenia
89.October 5 — October 9, 1999 – India and Georgia
90.February 24 — February 26, 2000 – Egypt (Great Jubilee pilgrimage to Mount Sinai)
91.March 20 — March 26, 2000 – Jordan, the Palestinian territories, and Israel (Great Jubilee pilgrimage to the Holy Land)
92.May 12 — May 13, 2000 – Portugal (Great Jubilee pilgrimage to the Marian shrine in Fátima)
93.May 5 — May 9, 2001 – Greece, Syria, and Malta
94.June 23 — June 27, 2001 – Ukraine
95.September 22 — September 27, 2001 – Kazakhstan and Armenia
96.May 22 — May 26, 2002 – Azerbaijan and Bulgaria
97.July 23 — August 2, 2002 – Canada (celebration of World Youth Day 2002 in Toronto), Guatemala, and Mexico
98.August 16 — August 19, 2002 – Poland
99.May 3 — May 4, 2003 – Spain
100.June 5 — June 9, 2003 – Croatia
101.June 22, 2003 – Bosnia and Herzegovina
102.September 11 — September 14, 2003 – Slovakia
103.June 5, 2004 – Switzerland
104.August 14 — August 15, 2004 – France (pilgrimage to the Marian shrine in Lourdes)

Jean Paul II

Today is a special day for Catholics, especially those of Polish descent. Pope John Paul II will be beatified during a Mass presided over by Pope Benedict XVI in St. Peter’s Square in Rome on what is known as Divine Mercy Sunday. After today, Pope John Paul II will be addressed as “Blessed.” Beatification is the third of the four steps in the canonization process in the Catholic church. The day is significant because Pope John Paul II promulgated the devotion whereby Catholics pray the chaplet on Rosary beads so God can forgive sins. The pontiff designated Divine Mercy Sunday on April 30, 2000, the same year he canonized Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska, the Polish nun who received apparitions from Jesus between 1931-1938. “This is the greatest connection that can be,” said the Rev. Andrew Knop, a priest with the Oblates of Mary Immaculate in Tewksbury. Knop, a priest for 23 years, was born in Poland and came to the United States in 1991. The Rev. Anthony Kuzia, pastor of St. Patrick Church in Pelham, agrees.
“God works in mysterious ways, and it all comes together,” Kuzia said. “We’re happy and rejoicing he is being beatified.” Being the first Polish pope in the history of the Catholic church, Kuzia said Pope John Paul II’s beatification is significant. “I know all that my grandparents went through living under Communism, and when they came here, they brought with them a very strong faith,” he said. “When (he) became pope, it showed how important the faith of the Polish people was in the midst of their hardship. His beatification is another reaffirmation of that faith, a way of confirming that the faith and devotion that has been so prevalent in Poland has been preserved.” Today, Nancy Malo of Atkinson will not only be watching Pope John Paul’s beatification, but praying the chaplet of Divine Mercy at 3 p.m. “They could not have chosen a better day,” said Malo, a member of Sts. Mary and Joseph Parish in Salem, N.H., who met the pontiff 10 years ago. “This is very much in keeping with his pontificate. He kept telling us of God’s mercy and not to be afraid.” Malo is not surprised that Pope John Paul II is being beatified so soon after his death. “I fully expected it would come, but I didn’t know it was in my lifetime. He was an extraordinary shepherd and his spiritual leadership and now his elevation to ‘Blessed’ is an opportunity to connect and to discover the church,” she said. Born Karol Joseph Wojtyla in 1930, John Paul II was elected pope in 1978. He was the first Polish cardinal to hold the position and the first non-Italian pope since Adrian VI in 1522. Wojtyla chose the name John Paul II in honor of his predecessor, who died after only 33 days as pope. Pope John Paul II served as leader of the world’s Catholics for 26 years. Beatification is the first step taken by the church hierarchy before someone is named a saint. Calls for Pope John Paul II’s sainthood began at his funeral, when the crowd outside St. Peter’s Basilica chanted “santo subito” — Italian for “saint immediately.” The first miracle attributed to Pope John Paul II was the cure of a French nun who suffered from Parkinson’s disease. Members of the Congregation of Little Sisters of Catholic Maternity Wards prayed to him on her behalf, and she was cured. The second miracle happened in 2009, when a Polish boy who was in a wheelchair due to kidney cancer visited John Paul II’s tomb in the basilica. The boy left walking. It usually takes decades after death for a Catholic who has done miraculous work to be elevated to sainthood, but just six years after his death, supporters believe Pope John Paul II deserves sainthood because of his worldwide influence. Kuzia said he always felt the Catholic church would declare Pope John Paul II a saint one day. “I was not surprised. Pope John Paul II was a very holy man, priest and pontiff,” he said. “Pope John Paul II lived a life of heroic virtue. His love for all people was very evident in the almost tireless way he gave of himself. Even after he had been shot and later when he became quite ill, he was still traveling and working to bring Christ’s message to others.” Ann Marie Johnson, who is half Polish, could not be more pleased about Pope John Paul’s beatification. “I’m just happy. After all the suffering that he went through, living through Communism, look what has come about from it. Now we have an advocate in heaven for all those who suffer,” said Johnson, a member of St. John the Baptist Church in Haverhill.
Knop, who will say Mass in Polish at Corpus Christi Parish in Lawrence today, met Pope John Paul II in 2004 when his religious order had their general chapter in Rome.
“It was a special moment. He was very sick, yet he still met with us, although he did not speak,” he said. “He was suffering because of his illness, but he still wanted to be with the people.
“He lived life to the end, suffering and carrying the cross,” Knop said.
Still, some people, like Thomas Groome, a professor and chairman of the department of theology at Boston College, feel Pope John Paul II’s beatification is premature.
He said church leaders should have beatified Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker Movement, or Bishop Oscar Romero, the priest from El Salvador who was gunned down while saying Mass in 1980, instead of Pope John Paul II.
In the year 2000, Pope John Paul II gave permission to open Day’s cause for sainthood. The canonization process for Romero is also in process, and Pope John Paul II bestowed him the title of Servant of God.
“Why are they rushing? The church has never been under more public scrutiny and public critique than it was during his papacy,” he said, referencing the priest sexual abuse scandal.
“Should he be raised up for Catholics to emulate as a model? He should be eventually, but rushing his cause is ambiguous.”

Miracle Jean Paul II

Sister Marie Simon-Pierre’s inexplicable cure was deemed by the Vatican the miracle needed to beatify John Paul. Her story will be the highlight of the all-night prayer vigil on Saturday ahead of Sunday’s beatification in St. Peter’s Square.
Pope John Paul II’s own suffering is being highlighted in his beatification, with aides testifying about his long battle with Parkinson’s disease. And a French nun cured of the same ailment will take a starring role in the beatification ceremonies.
Sister Marie Simon—Pierre’s inexplicable cure was deemed by the Vatican the miracle needed to beatify John Paul. Her story will be the highlight of the all—night prayer vigil on Saturday ahead of Sunday’s beatification in St. Peter’s Square.
Tens of thousands of people are converging on Rome for the beatification. Many are expected to attend the vigil in Rome’s Circus Maximus, a sprawling ancient field, where the nun will be joined by John Paul’s longtime private secretary and spokesman.